Home > Featured Articles > UTV Trends 2018
Photo provided by Hisun.

UTV Trends 2018

Outdoor Power Equipment (OPE) recently asked leading UTV manufacturers for their insights into UTV trends and what dealers need to know regarding this product segment. Their responses are as follows:

 

 

OPE: What trends are you seeing in the market as a whole with regard to UTV design, manufacture, marketing and sales?

 

It is very competitive, and there are many new players in the UTV world. Some seemed focused on vehicles just to “get around.” Many others are focused on a specific segment, such as work or off road. Selling to a wide variety of customers and trying to fit all applications is challenging. We are also seeing more refined and finished products, replicating the auto industry.

Brad Unruh, director of product strategy, Excel Industries (Hustler)

 

For many consumers, a car or pickup truck is their point of reference when selecting a utility vehicle. UTVs are continuing to be more automotive-influenced in their design, operation and comfort features. Likewise, selling and marketing UTVs continues to move toward an approach associated with a passion-driven power product, as opposed to the traditional approach of selling a tool to do a specific set of jobs.

Tom Mielke, UTV product manager, Cub Cadet

 

 

Utility vehicles are becoming even more durable with improved suspensions, four-wheel disc brakes and multiple drive mode functions to match varying ground conditions. Hydrostatic transmissions are available, which provide dynamic braking. That means that when an operator’s foot is removed from the brake pedal, the system naturally reduces the flow of oil, causing the machine to slow, meaning less wear on the brakes and reduced fuel consumption. In addition to performance, the number of options and accessories has increased since these vehicles were first introduced, providing an enhanced work environment in the cab compared to older models.

– Jason Boerger, marketing manager, Bobcat Company

 

The most significant trend has been the shift to crossover utility vehicles. The market has grown in terms of the number of different applications these vehicles are used for. The other trends are comfort and performance. Making work easier is important. You see new UTV designs around accessories, bed features, convenience features in the operator station like large entry space, abundant legroom, and comfortable seats. When you’re in and out of a vehicle all day, comfort is key. We took all these features in mind when redesigning our new Retriever UTV lineup.

Maddie Hayhre, assistant brand manager, utility vehicles, Mahindra North America

 

We see the use of utility vehicles in work applications becoming more popular. By work applications, we mean using the UTV as a support vehicle on a job site or farm, and not simply for recreational purposes.

Norma Aldinger, marketing manager (for UTVs), Caterpillar

 

Three main areas of customer focus are driving utility vehicle trends: durability, capability and comfort. As with any machine that people use to accomplish their tasks, durability is critical, whether it’s a commercial job, or a job at your farm or home. There are newer models on the market, and older models with newer components intended to improve in this area. Of course, this always has to be balanced with cost, and backed by a reliable, capable channel support network.

Capability with a utility vehicle is difficult to measure, and very dependent on how a customer uses their vehicle. Terrain capability, cargo capability, passenger capability, and all types of capabilities have to be balanced. That’s why John Deere offers such a wide range of vehicles with differing speeds, transmissions, power levels, cargo boxes and seating configurations. You can’t fit the whole market with one size.

Comfort remains an important area of focus, particularly as more worksites are focusing on retaining employees. Comfortable utility vehicles increase operators’ satisfaction and productivity, which is ultimately positive for the business. By selecting a machine equipped with a cab, including air conditioning and heat, operator comfort is increased, as is productivity.

Kevin Lund, John Deere product line marketing manager for utility vehicles

 

The market continues to grow and evolve as more people are seeking outdoor adventures at the same time that more businesses are using side-by-side vehicles on the job. Based on these trends, Yamaha – while maintaining its legendary durability and reliability –has focused on delivering proven off-road capability and comfort that people want for a confidence-inspiring experience whether they’re working or playing outdoors.

We’re also building more versatility into our machines. The Wolverine X4, for example, has a convertible four-to-two seat cab configuration that allows operators to carry more passengers or more gear depending on how they’re using the vehicle. And the Viking models, while based on a more utility platform, have superior off-road performance and four-wheel-drive capabilities that make them fun to drive.

Scott Newby, Yamaha ATV/SxS public relations

 

The focus seems to be on building bigger, more powerful machines that can be accessorized to the point that they essentially are small trucks –integrated full cabs, stereos, air conditioning, etc. –that are designed with a fit and finish of the automotive industry and less like aftermarket bolt-on attachments. The quality and durability of UTVs has increased across all the brands.

Carey Ackley, MBA, dealer development manager, Hisun

 

 

Kubota started manufacturing utility vehicles in 2004 when we introduced the first RTV. During the last 14 years, Kubota’s utility vehicle line has evolved and expanded to include diesel, gas, general and worksite models. The industry is more focused than ever on making the utility vehicle a more versatile machine since the introduction of the front-mounted PTO assembly. This offers another option for municipalities, schools and snow management companies’ commercial-grade equipment for their operation. This comes at a lower cost of ownership for these operations.

Roger Gifford, Kubota product marketing manager, utility vehicles

 

While it’s not new, the crossover-style platform is still seeing momentum in the UTV market. We’re also seeing the introduction of more creature comforts into the vehicle design, and available accessories. As technology costs are coming down on passenger vehicle components, we’re seeing more and more of that technology trickle down into UTVs. The focus on innovation for a long time seemed to revolve around the arms race to get to 1,000cc engines. Now that so many are there, the innovation is going into other areas of customization. We’re also seeing more imported competition marketing itself as American-made product. Lastly, the competition around financing promotions continues to get more fierce.

Lindsey DeLong, national sales manager, American LandMaster

 

As technologies continue to advance in the automotive market, we are seeing many of those technologies crossing into the UTV and powersports market. Our ZEUS Touch 7-inch GPS display is a perfect example of the technologies that will continue to become more advanced and become more standard as time progresses. I use the example quite frequently that, “You basically cannot even go buy a car these days that doesn’t come with some sort of digital touch display instead of the historic analog or standard digital displays.” This will continue to be the trend of bringing the digital world to the outdoors. With those advances in technology, dealers and manufacturers must also start changing how they reach their target audiences and figure out new methods to attract the younger generations to their products. The way consumers are shopping has completely changed over the past decade, and will continue to change. Dealers and/or manufacturers that get stuck in the ways of the past and cannot evolve will struggle to survive in this ever-growing online digital world.

Casey Slingerland, director of sales, ODES Industries

 

 

OPE: What trends, if any, are you seeing with regard to shifts/changes in the types of UTV end users, as well as any shifts or changes regarding UTV dealers?

 

It seems many new “work” vehicles are hitting the market, along with some crossover offerings. Entities are realizing the benefits and productivity that a well-built quality UTV can bring to their operation. Also, small to mid-size property owners seem to be gravitating to these vehicle to perform tasks throughout their property.

Brad Unruh, director of product strategy, Excel Industries (Hustler)

 

 

UTV end users have better products and more variety to choose from than ever before. They are selecting products that are comfortable, stylish, and easy-to-use; and the level of sophistication and consumer expectations rises with each new model release. Since the UTV segment is the fastest-growing across all powersports products, more dealers are taking on UTV product lines. This is a great counter-seasonal balance for a lot of dealerships, but consumer expectations are higher for product and service quality and performance.

Tom Mielke, UTV product manager, Cub Cadet

 

It seems a growing number of rural residents, farmers and ranchers want more speed out of their work vehicles, and are willing to pay more to get it. There’s a great opportunity for dealers to add crossover UTVs to the current offering, and provide a broader range of models to the existing customer base. Mahindra is proud to offer that extensive range of products.

Maddie Hayhre, assistant brand manager, utility vehicles, Mahindra North America

 

Recently, companies like Caterpillar have entered the UTV market. Having a utility vehicle offered through participating UTV Cat dealers allows another option to not only purchase a utility vehicle, but also know that parts and service will be available for support of the customer who chooses not to complete that work themselves.

Norma Aldinger, marketing manager (for UTVs), Caterpillar

 

 

In general, we have seen more landscapers diversifying their businesses, adding new jobs, such as snow removal, yard cleanup services, hardscaping and other jobs to extend their work beyond growing seasons and increase revenue throughout the year. Utility vehicles are ideal for diversification, as they can be used for a variety of applications. New operator comfort features and the availability of a variety of attachments, including front blades that can be used throughout the year to move dirt or remove snow, are making utility vehicles more appealing.

Obviously, too, with the growth in the market, and the expanding customer base for these products, we’re seeing more and more dealers and brands offering utility vehicles. Just like with mowing equipment, earth-moving equipment, or anything else anyone uses to create value in their business, the ability of that dealer and brand to support the user with available parts and knowledgeable service is key to their success.

Kevin Lund, John Deere product line marketing manager for utility vehicles

 

End users want more variety, so they can work during the week and play during the weekend. They want a vehicle that can do both. Yamaha makes durable, versatile machines from the recreation-based Wolverine X4 to the more utility-based Vikings. Dealers need to offer the products and support (services) to meet this growing demand.

Scott Newby, Yamaha ATV/SxS public relations

 

 

Consumers are accessorizing their UTVs more and more. Manufacturers and aftermarket companies are developing products that allow a consumer to easily customize their UTVs to maximize the capability of the machine for its intended purpose.

Carey Ackley, MBA, dealer development manager, Hisun

 

UTVs have been replacing more expensive vehicles such as trucks on many jobsites. The lower cost of ownership has been the purchase driver. Utility vehicles have reduced fuel cost, insurance and maintenance cost versus using a pickup truck.

In today’s market, it is common for a customer to make a utility vehicle purchase based on the attachments it can be outfitted with. For example, municipalities are specifically looking for snow blowers and blades to clear sidewalks; facility managers are looking for sprayers; and contractors are seeking rotary brooms to help maintain their worksites. These fleet managers walk into a dealership looking for these specific attachments first, and the utility vehicle they are operated with can become a secondary qualifier. As a result of this shift in demand, dealers are increasingly outfitting their showroom models with attachments, showcasing their versatile capabilities.

Roger Gifford, Kubota product marketing manager, utility vehicles

 

We’re seeing more and more traditional ag dealers, like farm and ranch stores, bring on UTVs. They fit the needs of their customers, and they already have that captive, working audience. We’re also seeing growth dealers that have traditionally been devoted to the golf cart market. For those leisure folks that want something just a little more adventurous, UTVs are becoming more of an option, as we see the price of UTVs continue to get more competitive at the lower end. They’re getting significantly more performance and capability, without spending a lot more money.

Lindsey DeLong, national sales manager, American LandMaster

 

The UTV industry is continuing to grow as consumers are finding more uses and pleasure riding opportunities with these types of vehicles. While you have your workers, ranchers, and farmers finding that the price and versatility of these machines suits their needs rather than high-priced work trucks or commercial vehicles that can be expensive to repair or that cannot go nearly as many places, you also have the growing recreational markets. A drastic increase of “weekend warriors” are purchasing UTVs to use recreationally at riding parks, trail systems and regional riding events, which are becoming very popular among younger consumers. We typically see those in the age range of 18 to 35 looking to purchase a sport or sport utility type machine that they will be using for pleasure riding, mudding, off-roading events and local trail systems while the older generations are purchasing these vehicles to use for ranch/farm work, hunting or to replace some kind of utility truck or piece of equipment. With the wide range of consumers, you also have a growing network of dealers and manufacturers that are getting into the UTV space. Over the past decade, we have seen the expansion of dealer types go from mainly powersports dealerships to now having auto dealers, OPE dealers, tractor dealers, marine dealers and even RV dealers starting to carry a variety of UTV brands. A dealer who carries outdoor equipment or tractors already has a solid customer base that may be in the market for a UTV or may be looking to trade up to a newer model, and this allows the dealer to create another pipeline of profit. Not only do these other types of dealers already have the customer base, but bringing on UTVs allows them to bring in additional customers that they may have not acquired if they don’t carry UTVs. These new customers are very important, because not only will they come purchase a UTV, but they could then come back to purchase a tractor, zero-turn mower or RV because they already have a relationship and history with that dealership. The UTV and ATV line opens the dealer up to an entirely new customer base they may have not had previously, and will increase sales across all of their lines.

Casey Slingerland, director of sales, ODES Industries

 

OPE: What advice to you have for outdoor power equipment dealers who have not carried UTVs in the past, but who are considering adding UTVs to their product mix?

 

Know your target customer. Also, margins are not great. You need to make money on accessories and service. And service is key. Make sure you can take care of your customer. You may have to “tow and show” to get the vehicles in front of the specific intended customer. It is a very competitive marketplace.

Brad Unruh, director of product strategy, Excel Industries (Hustler)

 

The most important thing for new dealers in the category is to remember that UTVs are passion products on which people spend their discretionary time and money. Consumer expectations are higher than they are with purely task-based products or tools.

Tom Mielke, UTV product manager, Cub Cadet

 

There are a variety of utility vehicle options out there, so dealers need to understand what their customers’ needs are. It’s important they ask themselves how their customers will use the units and whether the desired units will meet the needs day in and day out. Dealers need to also consider what popular options their customers might want/need such as fully enclosed cabs, heat and air conditioning, power steering, rearview and side-view mirrors, front/rear work lights, and a radio and speakers.

– Jason Boerger, marketing manager, Bobcat Company

 

UTVs are a universal tool today on farms, golf courses, universities, corporate campuses, fire rescue, municipalities and parks –and even among homeowners. No matter the need, there is a UTV that fits the job; and manufacturers keep refining and tailoring this product in response. Mahindra offers factory-installed accessories with no assembly required to help dealers with time and efficiency. There’s money to be made, and UTVs would be a great addition for any outdoor power equipment dealer.

Maddie Hayhre, assistant brand manager, utility vehicles, Mahindra North America

 

The utility market is diverse and continues to grow. Know where you want to focus in the market, and which segments of customers you plan to focus with.

Norma Aldinger, marketing manager (for UTVs), Caterpillar

 

The most important thing for a dealer to do, as with almost anything else, is to have a good understanding of their customers’ needs. The industry has seen many examples of dealers picking up recreational-type products to try to serve commercial needs. Matching the right customer to the right vehicle is a learning curve, and it’s important to at least understand the basics before taking on a whole new line of products.

It’s also important for dealers to find opportunities to educate customers about the vehicles they carry. Dealers should never assume that their customers are aware of utility vehicles and the many benefits and uses on a jobsite, or how one model can work differently in different applications than another. When speaking with customers, it is important to learn more about the projects they are working on, and identify opportunities to educate customers about the right vehicle for their application.

Kevin Lund, John Deere product line marketing manager for utility vehicles

 

Look at reputable brands, and watch out for new entries into the market. While the SxS market continues to grow, it’s more important than ever to work with OEMs that provide a level of support –from models to accessories to financing –that established and proven companies, like Yamaha, can provide.

Scott Newby, Yamaha ATV/SxS public relations

 

Do a complete cost analysis across several different manufacturers. Know the price point your current customer base would be willing to spend on a UTV. Understand how a UTV can help your customer in their business or around their property. There can be very drastic differences in what a UTV margin is on paper and what margins are actually realized by dealers in the market. How many other dealers for that brand of UTV are in their general market area and will most likely be competing for that same buyer? Consumers are leveraging technology and will shop dealers for the best pricing they can find in a three- to four-hour radius of their location.

Carey Ackley, MBA, dealer development manager, Hisun

 

If a dealer has a customer base in landscaping, turf or construction, I would recommend that they are sure the lines they take on are built for those types of heavy-duty worksite applications. Worksite utility vehicles are often “put to the test,” and take constant wear and tear. Not all utility vehicles are engineered to manage such workloads. Therefore, it is important for dealers to look for a utility vehicle that can handle that type of work. Specifically, they should be standard equipped with a hydrostatic transmission, fully hydraulic steering, and enclosed wet disc brakes. These integrated drive systems work together and provide reliable performance on a jobsite, especially once attachments are utilized.

Roger Gifford, Kubota product marketing manager, utility vehicles

 

Specifically as it relates to American LandMaster, we’re a natural addition because we’re focused on building low-maintenance machines that use air-cooled engines. The Briggs and Kohler engines these OPE dealers are used to working on, are the same engines we use to power our UTVs. This means less of a learning curve for the sales team, and the techs, and also saves money for the shop on parts investment. UTVs also provide a slightly less seasonal good, to help balance cash flow throughout the year. UTVs are still subject to seasonality, but because they can be used for such a broad range of tasks, and by a broad range of users, you’re as likely to sell one in spring for general property upkeep, as you are in the fall as a snow plowing unit.

Lindsey DeLong, national sales manager, American LandMaster

 

For any OPE dealers that are looking to get into the UTV industry, my advice would be to get educated on the UTV market, get educated on your local competitors and their product lines, and get educated on what it takes to be a successful UTV dealership. The more you can educate yourself and your staff the more successful you will be as in any business. Consumers want to have a positive buying experience from a dealership that they feel really knows what they are offering and will offer them good products and services for years to come. When you are able to do this, you will increase your consumer base across all the product lines you carry and you will create residual business from those customers. New dealers from industries other than powersports need to indulge themselves in the industry and into the lines they carry to make them a sole part of their business. It cannot be something they bring on in the hope that people will just line up around the block to purchase. They need to advertise heavily and stay educated so they can keep their local consumers interacting with their dealership and interested with their products. Online and digital marketing will play huge roles.

Casey Slingerland, director of sales, ODES Industries

 

 

OPE: What is your overall outlook regarding the UTV industry, especially any insight as it relates to dealers and their businesses?

 

It continues to be a very competitive industry. There are many options to consider –work, play, crossover. Identify your target customer, and fill out your UTV offering to meet that customer’s expectations. I believe more and more people are seeing the need and usefulness of UTVs to replace other equipment in the work segment; especially as these UTVs evolve. Look for quality build, not just cheap offerings.

Brad Unruh, director of product strategy, Excel Industries (Hustler)

 

UTVs provide a year-round source of revenue, and can bring new customers into dealerships. We expect the category to continue to grow, and consumer expectations are growing each year, too. The successful brands are those who continue to innovate and offer value that UTV owners can readily see, feel and appreciate.

Tom Mielke, UTV product manager, Cub Cadet

 

The construction industry has been steadily growing since 2009. Continued construction-industry growth has played a large role in the growth of the UTV industry. We should see this trend continue in 2018 as small increases are forecasted in the commercial building and public works segments. The agriculture segment can be another great market for UTV’s, but it can also be volatile. Equipment purchases can go hand in hand with ag commodity prices. When those markets are down, equipment purchases are slower.

More often than not, a UTV is purchased quickly or out of necessity, and isn’t a planned-out purchase. This makes proper floor planning highly important to dealer success. Dealers really need to be in tune with the industry, and plan accordingly.

– Jason Boerger, marketing manager, Bobcat Company

 

The industry is strong, and 2018 looks very good. There is a lot of positive and encouraging activity in the UTV category that we should be celebrating. We are excited about our new Retriever 1000 Gas product. It’s not just a new product offering, it’s a whole new business solution, and that is exciting. UTVs work well and are reliable and terrific products overall. Dealerships need to focus on providing a positive customer experience and the product will sell itself.

Maddie Hayhre, assistant brand manager, utility vehicles, Mahindra North America

 

We are optimistic about the future growth of utility vehicles. One of the reasons Caterpillar entered this business is because customers were asking for a utility vehicle that we designed specifically for work applications. We continue to hear positive feedback from our dealers and customers about how customers who have never owned a utility vehicle are thinking about a future purchase.

Norma Aldinger, marketing manager (for UTVs), Caterpillar

 

We are very optimistic about the future of the UTV industry. We have seen increased interest and use of utility vehicles in recent years across a large number of different customer types, a trend we anticipate will continue. We’re continuing to develop new attachments and updating features that boost productivity and operator comfort, to make it easier for new customers to see the clear advantages of utility vehicles in their application. We will continue to provide our customers with the innovative equipment they need to help tackle any job they may face.

Kevin Lund, John Deere product line marketing manager for utility vehicles

 

We expect the SxS/UTV market will continue to grow as more people get out to enjoy off-road adventures with friends and families, and more people use the vehicles on the job. That’s where Yamaha excels –in the recreational and multipurpose segment with durable, reliable, off-road capable models across the board. We also see more people personalizing their vehicles with accessories off-the-floor, and we’d recommend dealers look to established OEMs with accessories designed alongside the vehicle, like Yamaha Genuine Accessories, to ensure the best fit and finish.

Scott Newby, Yamaha ATV/SxS public relations

 

The market continues to grow. New manufacturers continue to get in the market bringing new and different products. It’s definitely bloody waters with a lot of different options. The consumer benefits as manufacturers fight to produce higher quality, more capable UTVs.

Carey Ackley, MBA, dealer development manager, Hisun

 

The industry as whole has shown growth again in 2017, and 2018 is looking like another strong year.

Roger Gifford, Kubota product marketing manager, utility vehicles

 

The UTV market continues to look promising moving forward, but it certainly is up to the dealers to make sure that they are successful locally. The most important thing a dealer can do is invest in a solid website. Consumers are spending a good deal of time researching UTVs before making a purchase, and local dealerships and their inventory are a significant part of that research. If you don’t have a good website, it’s tough to take advantage of local web searches, or social media ads. As a brand, we can help grow brand awareness on a national level, but we really need our dealers to partner with us at the local level to make sure that they’re capturing that local search traffic. To that end, also don’t let co-op funds go unused. UTVs are a higher price item, so you can accrue some significant co-op funds pretty easily. Make sure you’re working with your manufacturer to use those dollars to grow your business. Embrace social media. Get creative. Engage with the local audience any way you can. Lean on your manufacturers to help train and inform your sales and tech staff.

Lindsey DeLong, national sales manager, American LandMaster

 

UTVs themselves will continue to evolve, as will the industry as manufacturers continue to push the envelope on what these machines are capable of. Dealers selling these types of vehicles need to keep up with the times and focus on advertising online, social media and other digital outlets in order to keep pace and continue to increase their sales. The younger generations are what is going to keep the industry on the uphill climb and it is up to the dealers and manufacturers to develop and design products that will appeal to these consumers.

Casey Slingerland, director of sales, ODES Industries

 

Editor’s Note: Responses were gathered between April 2 and April 24, 2018, and are presented in the order in which they were received.

 

UTV Trends 2018: Innovations

As part of Outdoor Power Equipment (OPE) magazine’s UTV Trends 2018 coverage, OPE asked the manufacturers that responded to share insight into their latest UTVs, any new products/upgrades coming soon, as well as new about their equipment/brand. Their responses are presented as follows (in the order in which they were received):

 

Excel Industries (Hustler)

The new Hustler MDV (Maximum Duty Vehicle) is a tough, precision-built utility vehicle featuring a 1028cc Kohler diesel engine, 14-gallon fuel tank, 1,650-pound load capacity, 2WD/AWD, and a top speed of 37 mph. The MDV is also available with patented LeveLift bed technology. With a flip of a switch, the LeveLift brings the cargo box up, back, and down, enabling the user to load at ground level or at any point along the bed’s arc of motion, and back up into position. Note: The LeveLift has a 750 lb. lift capacity. There is a wide range of accessories available for the MDV.

 

Cub Cadet

Cub Cadet’s latest UTV release is a compact vehicle, the Challenger 400 4×4, which began appearing at Cub Cadet retailers in February 2018. “Compact” means that it is 50 inches wide, so it can fit in the bed of a full-size pickup, and is narrow enough to be used on width-limited ATV trails. It also takes up less garage or shed space. Although the vehicle is compact in size, it comes with several full-size standard features that would normally be sold separately, such as a hard top, brake lights and an adjustable driver’s seat. Cub Cadet’s philosophy is to offer people more features and capability than they thought they could afford. The Challenger 550 and 750 series that Cub Cadet introduced a year ago embodies this best. Cub Cadet set out to raise the bar in terms of comfort, capability, convenience and capability in a mid-size, modestly-priced vehicle. It features an automotive-style interior, with intuitive positions for controls and gauges. It has high-sided doors to protect from dust, mud and splashes. Plus, there are a lot of standards features such as a winch, roof, windshield, brake lights and turn signals, as well as high-performance adjustable shocks that are included in all models. In terms of convenience, the cab can be fully enclosed for cold-weather riding in less than five minutes. It’s the easiest-to-install cab enclosure on the market.

 

Bobcat Company

Bobcat Company offers six utility vehicles (in different configurations), including two hydrostatic models, which are available from authorized Bobcat dealerships. All six utility vehicles provide ample horsepower and speed, allowing for increased jobsite productivity. The gas-powered 3400 and 3400XL feature a 40-hp. engine, while the diesel-powered 3400, 3400XL, 3600 and 3650 have a 24-hp. engine. Bobcat 3400 and 3400XL utility vehicles offer a top speed of 35 mph (when combined with an optional speed kit the 3400 and 3400XL can travel up to 40 mph). The 3600 and 3650 have a maximum speed of 30 mph. Each machine features low- or high-range speeds for towing heavy loads or moving light loads at faster speeds.

 

Mahindra North America

In the fall of 2017, Mahindra unveiled its completely newly redesigned line of UTVs, called Retriever. The UTV lineup consists of single-row, crew and long-bed models in both gas and diesel powertrains with Mahindra’s latest offering being the 1000 Gas cross-over UTV with 83 horsepower, and speeds up to 60 mph. Mahindra has been in the UTV business since 2015 and its UTVs are proudly built in Batesville, Ark.

 

Caterpillar

There will be four configurations of utility vehicles offered. At first production, a standard version (2 seat) will be offered with either gas or diesel power. More than 50 accessories will be available to customize these machines to individual operations.

 

John Deere

John Deere offers a wide range of utility vehicles designed to meet the needs of professional landscape contractors. The current lineup includes 19 models across three categories: Work, Crossover and High-Performance. With a variety of options, John Deere strives to offer a utility vehicle solution for any application. Most recently, John Deere unveiled its newest addition to the Gator lineup, the XUV835 and XUV865 utility vehicle models. The gas-powered 54-hp. Gator XUV835 and diesel-powered 23-hp. Gator XUV865 utility vehicles feature a quiet cab, three-wide seating, improved ergonomics, and available heating and air conditioning, ideal for operators working in a variety of weather conditions.

 

Yamaha

Built in the USA, the 2018 Yamaha Wolverine X4 is an all-new four-seat side-by-side designed to provide superior capability, comfort and confidence and deliver proven off-road performance. Smooth, quiet power comes from an all-new 847cc twin cylinder engine, while a compact, nimble chassis boasts the most versatile cab in its class with industry-exclusive, stow-away, full-size rear seats for expanded cargo capacity on demand. Yamaha’s utility-based models include the Viking and Viking VI, available in roomy three- and six-seat configurations with a hydraulic dump bed and powered by a 686cc, liquid-cooled, fuel-injected, SOHC power plant. Yamaha Viking models also feature Yamaha Real World Tech including the driver-controlled on-command 4WD system; the proven, most durable, Ultramatic automatic transmission; and electric power steering.

 

Hisun

Hisun offers a full line up of UTVs. Hisun manufacturers UTVs to fit the needs of a broad range of consumer demands: Youth Model Sector 250; 2-passenger HS Series; 3-passenger Sector 450, 550, 750 and 1000; and 6-passenger Sector Crew 750 and 1000.

 

Kubota

Kubota currently offers two different sizes of RTVs:

  1. Mid-size RTV Series, which includes the RTV400Ci and the RTV500
  2. Full-size RTV-X Series, which includes the RTV-X900, the RTVX1100C, the RTV-X1140 and the RTV-X1120 diesel models and new RTV-XG850 Sidekick gas model.

The new RTV-X1120 models are Kubota’s most well-equipped utility vehicles at the best price among its competition. Designed for commercial customers who use these machines for heavy-duty work every day, the Kubota RTV-X1120 general purpose model combines Kubota quality with enhanced power, torque and performance at a starting price point of $13,999 MSRP.

The RTV-X1120 features a dependable 24.8-gross-horsepower diesel engine, and is ready for any jobsite. Kubota-built and all-terrain proven, the 3-cylinder liquid-cooled diesel engine has a well-earned reputation for providing extra acceleration and climbing power. The engine and VHT-X transmission provide a top speed of 29 mph, as well as plenty of hill-climbing power. With the increased speed comes an increased dynamic load, so the RTV-X1120 comes equipped with three-point seatbelts for safety.

 

American LandMaster

For 2018, American LandMaster wanted to focus on offering its customers more options, and increased comfort and ease of use. The most notable additions are American LandMaster’s new Kohler-EFI-powered models, in American LandMaster’s 2WD, 4WD, and Crew families. Additionally, all Crew units come standard with power steering. The 4WD line is made up of four units with different engines options. The LS677EPS comes standard with EFI and power steering, while the rest of the 4WD line is power steering ready.

 

ODES Industries

ODES continues to be a disruptive force in the powersports industry by offering the best performance, best features and best warranty for hands down the best price. In fall of 2017 ODES released the 2018 Dominator X Special Edition lineup that features ODES’ patented Vi-Lock suspension system, ZEUS Touch 7-inch GPS display, and even factory heated seats for the ultimate in luxury and comfort. The X-Series Special Edition models also come standard with metal frame half doors, electric power steering, hard coated windshield with optional “Wash N’ Wipe” kit, 3,500-pound wirelessly controlled winches and even a 32-inch LED light bar mounted on the heavy-duty roof. ODES equipped all of its machines with the most popular add-on accessories that consumers are buying, without adding any additional costs. ODES designed the Special Edition line for those that deserve the best and want the best. In fall of 2018 ODES will once again shake things up as it will release several new models. Stay tuned.

About jkmitta

Privacy Preference Center